Brexit Might Threaten Dublin’s Position as One of the Most Attractive Cities for Global Companies

Dublin Center Spire
Brexit Might Threaten Dublin’s Position as One of the Most Attractive Cities for Global Companies

Brexit uncertainty might bring Dublin down in the rating of cities considered most attractive by multinational corporations for strategic relocation.

The latest Mercer Quality of Living survey has rated Dublin as the top city for living across the UK and Ireland.

The Mercer’s surveys are used by multinational organisations to help guide their expat decisions. The survey assesses local living conditions across 231 cities including political stability, the socio-cultural environment and housing.

According to the survey, Dublin has managed to keep its 2017 rating – 34th place – making it the highest ranked city across the UK and Ireland. London with its 41 place is the highest ranked UK city ahead of Edinburgh (46), Birmingham (50), Glasgow (50), Aberdeen (58) and Belfast (68). Dublin also beat Paris (39), Lisbon (38), Madrid (49) and Rome (57).

“Some of the key factors placing Dublin in 34th place in the survey include a stable political environment, lower levels of air pollution and a strong socio-cultural environment. The results demonstrate that Dublin remains an attractive location for international businesses to send their employees”

Noel O’Connor, consultant at Mercer Ireland

However, in the best post-Brexit expat destination Dublin is lagging behind its major European competitors as Frankfurt has taken the 7th place, Amsterdam (has come up 12 and Luxembourg – 18.

Also, not everyone is optimistic about Dublin’s high rating in future, as businesses are still in the dark about how exactly the border between the two countries will work.

The survey’s findings did not take into account the possibility of import tariffs and other factors that might considerably increase big companies’ spendings on salaries and other expenses connected with attracting global talent to their Ireland’s HQ.

Read the original article on Emigrate.co.uk. © 2018.